I have to confess that ludicrous science fiction films are often a guilty pleasure for me, an interest I shared with my late father and still share with my brother. Many years ago, in theaters I watched the first and second films in the Terminator series, which postulated that in the not too distant future an Artificial Intelligence takes over the world by waging a genocidal campaign against humanity, which resists.

More recently, Netflix aired a film with a similar theme entitled I Am Mother. The official trailer is below.

(Incidentally, I’m not aware of a Chinese YouTube channel equivalent to Russia’s RT or Vesti News, but China’s take on America’s “elites” would certainly be of interest as well.)

Like any other tool, AI was created by human beings; it can serve a good and higher purpose, as Mr. Richardson discussed, or it could develop into yet another doomsday device, although I think the probability of any such system achieving sentience like “Mother” is remote, as detailed in my recent article for LewRockwell.com on the nature of consciousness.

Also posted on this site was an article The Risk of Artificial Intelligence by Martin Armstrong. He writes:

But the fears running around about AI are really unfounded. They are based upon a THEORY that somehow consciousness will emerge from creating a program. Not that someone codes this development, it somehow just is born. I will never say ABSOLUTELY NO WAY, for this is a untested theory. It assumes that somehow man could create a soul so to speak. I just do not believe that.

Absolutely every step has to be coded. How do you move your arm? The thought must first emerge in your brain, your mind must know what path to send an instruction down to move the muscles. There are countless paths. You have to decided the direction. Which precise muscle to move and how.  There is a tremendous amount of coding that would be required.

I am pretty good at programming. This is all conceptual design. You first have to see it in your mind and then figure a way to code it to accomplish that end goal. This is not eary stuff. Sometimes you have to stare so hard at the problem and suddenly you see through it like a pane of glass – ah the path. Then the coding. The debugging is enough to drive you insane. The slightest most subtle error can take days to find and then you feel so stupid for it was in plane sight all the time. All of that requires the concept of how to accomplish a task. But how do you create emotion? That is different. Now you are talking about the freedom to just act arbitrarily. Of I could mimic a random thought generator seeded with the timer taking the last digit of the second. But that only creates the appearance of randomness. In programming, it is IMPOSSIBLE to create a true random generator for you quickly discover, whatever the project, it will fall back into as cycle for pure randomness cannot be coded.

I do not even know where to begin to try to create REAL human emotion since it is impossible to create randomness. I can mimic human emotion. You will get to see some of that in the final launch of Socrates. He can even joke. If you want to buy something that will decline sharply and is nowhere close to reaching a low in time or price, he can even come back and ask – Are you really sure? Did you have a bad day? But this is simply mimicking human nature. It is not creating it.

There is a substantial difference between actual random thought and mimicking since the first I cannot create, while the latter is a piece of cake. I would not know where to begin to create true emotional random thought since it is impossible to create even a simple random number generator. This is extremely important. For computers to turn against mankind as in the Terminator series or the Matrix, it requires emotion from which a random decision is made – like no I had a nasty day and suddenly I decided I do not like you.

Absolutely every step has to be coded. How do you move your arm? The thought must first emerge in your brain, your mind must know what path to send an instruction down to move the muscles. There are countless paths. You have to decided the direction. Which precise muscle to move and how.  There is a tremendous amount of coding that would be required.

I can create a self-aware system that will protect itself. No problem! I can create a system that will self-destruct or even defend itself with an electric charge – no problem. All that can be accomplished with writing code. I can even give a computer the ability to see as well as speak. That is no problem. Police already have facial recognition software. A computer can know who you are when you enter a room. While all of that may be food for Sci-Fi movies, but it is not the type of computer that will turn against its creator! If the government wants to create robots to kill man on command or create an army, that is no problem. It does not take free will to do that. Soldiers are trained to obey orders and NOT to question authority. Police are the same.

On Wired, we learn that “God Is a Bot, and Anthony Levandowski Is His Messenger.” Levandowski is one of the people responsible for self-driving cars (and that’s worked out really well, if you recall all those kamikaze Teslas) and perhaps he inspired the creators of I Am Mother:

Many people in Silicon Valley believe in the Singularity—the day in our near future when computers will surpass humans in intelligence and kick off a feedback loop of unfathomable change.

When that day comes, Anthony Levandowski will be firmly on the side of the machines. In September 2015, the multi-millionaire engineer at the heart of the trade secrets lawsuit between Uber and Waymo, Google’s self-driving car company, founded a religious organization called Way of the Future. Its purpose, according to previously unreported state filings, is nothing less than to “develop and promote the realization of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence.”

Pathetic doesn’t even begin to cover it. Therefore, let’s all take a deep breath and be more optimistic for a change: the world might be run by buffoons and lunatic occult obsessed sociopaths deluded into thinking they have the true secrets of the universe that are kept hidden from the unwashed masses but revealed to them (But the devil tells his victims what they want to hear, doesn’t he, starting from the Garden of Eden?), yet there is little likelihood that the Earth will all go up in flames—by either human or machine hands—any time soon. You don’t have to have a religious perspective to realize that truth.

Not that the religious should stop praying. Grave dangers are very real; but I’d like to think Mr. Richardson’s analysis is correct: Supercomputers and AI are making nuclear war less likely.

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